Eid

Celebrating Eid – The Islamic Way

Eid is a religious celebration
Whilst we celebrate Eid with family and friends, we must not lose sight of the fact of the religious significance of Eid. In the atmosphere of festivity, we must be careful not to use this opportunity to indulge in the haraam. So here are some guidelines to ensure that you have a joyous and halaal Eid!

  1. Avoid extravagance
    It is usual to spend more on Eid than other days, as we like to give gifts, and feed family and
    friends. However our spending should be within our means, and it should avoid
    extravagance. Allah says: “Do not waste your wealth. Those who spend wastefully are the brothers of Shayateen”. (Al-Israa: 17: 26-7).
  2. Remember the poor and needy
    Our time and our wealth should not just be for our family and friends. Eid is a time to remember those less fortunate than us, such as the poor, and those experiencing difficulty and hardship. Also do not neglect your revert brothers and sisters; they don’t have an extended Muslim family – so you need to be there for them.
  3. Do not neglect your prayers
    Missing the prayer is a major sin. You should endeavour to perform the prayer in the masjid.
  4. Avoid sins common on Eid
    Sins such as listening to music, free mixing and dressing inappropriately are all sadly common Eid.
  5. Looking your best on Eid
    It is recommended to do the following on Eid:
    • take a bath.
    • wear perfume (women must not wear it in the presence of men).
    • wear nice clean clothes (ensure the awrah is covered and your clothing does not resemble the opposite sex).
    • groom the hair (without copying non-Muslim styles).
    • apply Henna.
    • apply Kohl.
  6. Socialising during Eid
    It is strongly recommended to use this joyous occasion to visit relatives and friends. Eid is a time to strengthen the ties of kinships, and help the needy. However it is not permissible to single out the day of Eid to visit the graves of the deceased.
    Secondly we should apply the Islamic etiquettes related to free-mixing. Mixing with the opposite sex leads to a number of prohibitions including exchanging looks and flirting. These in turn lead to other sins which are destructive to society.
  7. Eid Greetings and gifts
    There are no specific greetings from the Sunnah but you may say the following:
    Taqabbala llaahu minnaa wa mink – may Allah accept it from us and you. This Eid greeting was said by the Sahaabah. (Mughni Ibn Qudama)
    As for saying “Eid Mubarak” there is no harm in it, even though the former greeting is better. If someone says Eid Mubarak to you, then respond likewise.
    Regarding giving gifts on Eid, there is no explicit instruction in the Sunnah. However giving gifts is something recommended in Islam and creates mutual love. It also brings joy to the hearts of children and gives them a feeling that Eid is something special.
  8. Eating and Drinking
    Abū Hurayra reported that “Allah’s Messenger prohibited fasting on two days, the day of Fitr and the day of Adha.” (Bukhari) In addition it is not permissible to fast during the days of tashreek (the three days after Eid al-Adha). As with all aspects of our religion, eating and drinking should avoid wastefulness, extravagance and showing off.
  9. Singing and beating the Duff.
    By consensus of the Salaf, music is prohibited in Islam. However the duff (similar to a
    tambourine but without bells or rings) is excluded from the prohibition of musical instruments in two cases:
    a) Using it during Eid celebrations.
    b) Using it in weddings.
    In both cases the duff is for women and children only, as the various h̩adīth reports that mention the duff, only state that women and children used it.
  10. Other pastimes on Eid
    It is good use Eid as an opportunity to play sports and games, and other outdoor activities such as boat rides, amusement rides, picnics, camping, and visiting farms, zoos and other places of interest.